Saturday, April 14, 2007

Metamorphosis is complete

Some years ago, I realized something that can be rather shocking: I was gradually turning into my father. (When did you have that realization? Were you shocked?) Don't get me wrong--my father, who has gone to his reward, is a fine man, someone I'm proud to be associated with. But one grows up aiming to be ones own man. Further, in my own case -- and this is true for many of us -- I remember so many odd habits and foibles of my father that we all kidded him about; so the shock came when, one after another, these were habits I discovered in myself!

It hit me when I caught myself slapping my hands together and rubbing them, just as dad always did; then the way I cleared my throat; then how I used dusty old words like "trousers." I was well along in the transformation when I discovered that I was sneezing loudly, in almost the same fashion that always exasperated my late mother.

But there was one step I was sure I'd never take. Until this morning. I reheated day-old coffee in the microwave. (My excuse is I ran out of coffee.)

Actually, I'm probably kidding myself--my dad lived to 97; I'm 45. I've got a lot of ground to cover.

I only hope I can acquire all his virtues so completely.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

What an absolutely hilarious, heartwarming, and nail-on-the-head post today, Father! Am sure your daddy is chuckling too, along with your many blogreaders.
Hubby & I have a son turning 40 next fall & he has already made similar observations. The process must be universal.
Annie

Fr. Larry Gearhart said...

I probably inherit my natural reserve from my father. He was also a big boned dude, even more so than me, though he was shorter.

Victor said...

Well, why do you think we've been calling you "Father" all these years.

Mrs Jackie Parkes MJ said...

Hi Fr,

Well your a year older than me!
Do you mind adding your blog & can i do the same with yours?

e-mail rosary@blueyonder.co.uk

God bless

Anonymous said...

Fr. Martin,

It is with both fondness and fear that I have to agree with you. I see my mother and my father in many things I do. Both good and bad. My parents have been dead for 21 and 25 years respectively and I am only 54 myself.

How blessed you are to have so many good memories. I'm glad you are able to laugh and appreciate them.

These memories do tend to give us a new appreciation for the lives we have and are living. The negative memories seem to lose influence in my life and the good memories increase the joy as my life continues on its course.

Thank God forgiveness is an ongoing choice. I feel it is only with that forgiveness and the grace it presents am I able to continue to put the negative memories and qualities into a smaller and smaller pocket each time they come up.

May all your memories and qualities continue to be blessings.

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Anonymous said...

Well, Father, I, also am 45 years old and reheat day-old coffee in the microwave. I'm glad to hear you do the same,as I've been feeling,uh, let us say, extremely thrifty (definitely not cheap!). Groceries are expensive, are they not? You know what they say, a penny saved, etc., etc.

Adoro te Devote said...

There must be something going around...I blogged about my own father just last night.

I took a different tack, however.

Love your observations...I learned some time ago that my Mom's habits were also my own, and I'm sure that as I get older, those same mannerisms are becoming even more apparent.

I think that happens to all of us.

Father Martin Fox said...

Anonymous:

Well, what I didn't explain was I really don't like day-old coffee, I always make fresh; but when I had no coffee...

Anonymous said...

Father, did your folks live to see you become ordained?

Greg Williams said...

I had the pleasure of meeting you and your father at Annunciation, and really enjoyed your observation.

I see this phenomenon in 2 directions...both in the ways I'm becoming my dad, and seeing my own quirks in my children. This can be rewarding when the kids are polite and considerate, and irritatingly insightful when the kids are 'know-it-alls' who can't keep their 2 cents to themselves.