Thursday, March 05, 2015

Should we put a woman on paper money?

New Yorker Magazine: A Campaign to Put a Woman on the Twenty-Dollar Bill

If you were going to do this, two questions:

1) Which woman would you choose?

2) On which bill?

(FWIW, I don't see that it has to be an American woman, although that would seem far more likely.)

I'd choose Rosa Parks; and I'd put her on the $50, instead of Grant. Between Grant and Jackson, the latter was far more consequential. Plus, he represents a period of history that is otherwise overlooked.

What are your answers?


20 comments:

Patrick said...

I like Rosa, and the $50 seems reasonable. Two other women I'd nominate would be Susan B Anthony (already on a coin, but still okay) or Sally Ride to commemorate a scientist and explorer.

gramps said...

We already tried this with the susy b anthony dollar. If we have to do this again, i go for the sarah palin $20

TerryC said...

I'd go with Grace Hopper on the $10 bill.

Pat said...

Hillary

ndspinelli said...

Hillary on the $3 bill. NTTAWWT.

ndspinelli said...

Rosa on the $50 is good. I would also put Clara Barton up for nomination as well.

Pat said...

ndspinelli, isn't your comment an act of slander?

ndspinelli said...

Absolutely not.

Unknown said...

For an American woman, I would like Amelia Earhart on the ten or twenty.

For a non-American woman, Marie Curie on either the 10 or the 20.

My reasoning for the lower denominations is that they would be seen more.

Pat said...

ndspinelli, you are suggesting that Hillary is gay. How isn't your comment an act of slander? Please explain your offensive comment.

ndspinelli said...

Truth is the ultimate defense to slander. That Hillary prefers women is well known in political circles. I could really care less. But, her living a lie is wrong. You do know what Bubba told Jennifer Flowers about Hillary when Flowers told him Hillary was gay? It's not proper for this forum. What I can say is Bubba laughed gave her a "Well, duh." Then a crude comment about lesbian practices followed.

Pat said...

ndspinelli, you should be ashamed of yourself. Fr. Martin's post is about women we should we honor, but you chose to take that as an opportunity to spread vicious gossip. I'm sorry your 2015 Lent is such a personal failure. Better luck next year.

ndspinelli said...

I apparently struck a nerve. That was not my intent. But, "The truth shall make you free."

Michael Haz said...

I am uncomfortabke with the idea of removing a man's likeness from paper money and replacing with a woman's image largely for political correctness. It has a feeling of conquest about it, and that isn't healthy.

It would be better to create a new paper currency, I think. Why not a $75 bill, or a $200 bill? Either would be useful.

As to whose likeness should be on the bill - that's the tricky part. The men on bills are presidents or generals; who is the female equivalent?

John F. Kennedy said...

I have two suggestions;

The first, the Virgin Mary. (Now who can top that one!). She should be on the $10 (cuz she's perfect!)

The second is Paula Nancy Millstone Jennings. (Look it up.)

Pat said...

The "female equivalent?"

Michael Haz, are you unaware that female generals serve in our military????

Michael Haz said...

Pat - I am well aware of that. The criteria, I believe, is a person, deceased, who did remarkable things to benefit our republic, in war and in leadership.

Fr Martin Fox said...

Michael:

FWIW, we have a couple of Cabinet Secretaries on money as well. Hamilton, for one; and Salmon P. Chase used to be on one of the bills; one of the dormant higher denomination ones, I think.

And we have Ben Franklin, who was -- apart from being a F.F., an ambassador.

Michael Haz said...

Thanks, Father. Give that, I'd happily carry folding money that had Condi Rice's likeness on it.

Sidney said...

Katharine Drexel.
1. She was rich and gave away her money.
2. She started schools for all sorts of people of color long before we ever heard of that term to describe Indians and Black Americans.
3. She's a Catholic saint.