Saturday, March 24, 2007

Who else is using Latin and chant in the Mass?

Since my arrival in Piqua, one of the things I've asked parishioners to do is to include a bit of Latin in Mass; we've used the Latin Agnus Dei and Sanctus, and had an occasional hymn or other prayer in Latin. In conversations with the handful of parishioners who have expressed comments on this, I get the idea that they perceive this to be something very unusual; I suspect some may be saying, "but no one else is doing this."

In fact, quite a few parishes around the country are doing this sort of thing, and a lot more in this vein. For those who care to, they can visit these sites here, and here, for recent posts, where people from around the country and elsewhere report happenings in their parishes. And I know of several parishes in this Archdiocese that are doing as much, or more, and I am confident others, of which I am unaware, are doing likewise.

Still, I got curious--just how many parishes are there, dabbling in this? Rather than wait for someone else to solicit the information, that's what I'm doing with this post...

If you know of a parish (i.e., it's either your parish, or you go there regularly) that is using any Latin on a regular basis, or using any Gregorian chant, please post here
. (I'd ask that this not be a place for folks to post opinions pro and con.) I ask that you identify the parish by name, city and diocese. If you can provide a link to a webpage or something else with more information, even better!

Oh, just to be clear--nothing against the classic, "Tridentine" Roman rite, but I'm not talking about that, either; that has to be in Latin. I mean celebrations of parish Masses (i.e., not private/special occasion Masses) according to the current, Vatican II rite of the Mass, And if that is being done with any--or even, all--in Latin, by all means, include that.

I'm going to keep updating the "when posted" date, so this stays toward the top. I'm hoping folks will link this on their pages, since the only value this has as a collection of information is if lots and lots of people come here and give their reports.

Update and reminder: Again, I am simply looking for celebrations of the current, Vatican II (so-called "Novus Ordo") Mass, with any amount of Latin and chant included. Nothing against the Tridentine or other rites, but my purpose is to find out how widespread is the inclusion of Latin in the current rite of the Mass...

And thanks for the many reports received, and the links that brought you here! Keep it coming!

Update, Thursday early am: this was originally posted Tuesday evening, but I'm moving it forward so it stays at the top of the page...

273 comments:

1 – 200 of 273   Newer›   Newest»
Rich Leonardi said...

My parish, St. Mary of Hyde Park in Cincinnati, chants the Kyrie in Greek during Advent and the Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent. I've recently pitched our pastor on 'normalizing' both for ordinary time, and although he is amenable to the suggestion, he recently announced his retirement.

Rich Leonardi said...

Almost forgot ...

Cincinnati's St. Rose along the Ohio River has reintroduced Chant for the ordinaries during Advent and Lent.

There's also Old St. Mary downtown which celebrates the Pauline Rite in Latin every Sunday morning at 9:15.

Jay Anderson said...

My parish - St. Mary, Norwalk - also chants the Kyrie in Greek and the Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent.

Anonymous said...

Well, my home parish, Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Carrollton, GA almost always has the Kyrie chanted in Greek.

The Agnus Dei is chanted in Latin off and on, though not recently.

The Our Father has recently changed from being sung in some ordinary melody to being chanted (but in English) in the traditional Gregorian chant style.

But, other than that, almost nothing else can be categorized as "in Latin" or "chant." Although the parish priest is very orthodox.

Anonymous said...

People in the San Francisco Bay Area should check out the Gregorian chant Mass that is sung every Sunday by the St. Anne Choir at St. Thomas Aquinas parish in Palo Alto, CA. Prof. William Mahrt of Stanford University has for many years (40 or so?) directed a dedicated and talented choir of volunteers. The Mass is a Novus Ordo. On a typical Sunday, gradual in Latin, propers for the day are sung in English, as are the readings (again, in English), and consecration is sung in English. Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, and Sanctus are all chanted in Latin. On holy days, the choir will sing a polyphonic Mass. On some holy days, the entire mass is in Latin.

Ann S. said...

Father Amberger at St. Remy in Russia, Ohio, celebrates a Latin Mass every Friday night. I'm not a parishioner there, but I believe they also chant the Kyrie and Agnus Dei during Advent and Lent. A beautiful little Orthodox parish out in the middle of nowhere... thanks to Fr. A.

Fr. Christopher G. Phillips said...

Our Lady of the Atonement Church in San Antonio, Texas celebrates the Mass in Latin every Sunday evening at 6:00 p.m. Also, the approximately 500 students at the parish school attend Mass every day, and the Mass each Friday is celebrated in Latin. (There's a happy thought -- all those kids, from four years old up through high school, all completely familiar with the Mass in Latin, and the chant which goes along with it!)

DigiHairshirt said...

At St. Joseph's in Santa Ana, CA, the Agnus Dei is sung in the traditional Latin chant for the grade school's 9:00 am Mass on Friday mornings.

Felipe said...

Sadly, I’d have to agree with your parishioners - given that “nobody” is a popular way of saying “such a comparatively small number as to be statistically irrelevant”.

My parish, Christ the Redeemer in Houston, TX, is singing the Easter sequence in Latin and doing some other chants (choir only) for the Triduum. Congregational chant will probably come after congregational Latin. (Other than, of course, “Pange lingua ... corporis”.)

Fr. Rob said...

Here at St. Stanislaus in Dorr, Michigan, we regularly use Latin and chant at Sunday Masses. This past Sunday, the 5th and 6th graders from our school chanted the Gregorian proper for communion, "Oportet te..." at our 11:00 AM Mass. They sang it very well, if I say so myself.

During Ordinary Time, between Christmas and Ash Wednesday, we began using the Gloria of Mass VIII (De angelis).

It's funny, when we started introducing more Latin last year, I heard some of the same complaints that "no one else is doing this, why are we?" That "no one" seems to be quite a few, after all.

Fr. Rob said...

That previous comment was me, BTW.

Fr. Rob Johansen
Pastor
St. Stanislaus Catholic Church

http://thrownback.blogspot.com

Greg Williams said...

At St. Jude the Apostle, Bridgetown (Cincinnati, OH), we have sung the Agnus Dei from Mass XVIII during Lent with enthusiasm. We 'introduced' the Sanctus from the same Mass last year, but it's taking a little while to catch on. The parish has also been using more Gregorian chant for the responsorial psalm and entrance, offertory, and Communion antiphons (in English).
Fr. Schmitmeyer at St. Aloysius Gonzaga (one parish/4 blocks east) uses the Mass XVIII Sanctus and Agnus Dei at 'a cappella' weekday Masses, and sings the General Intercessions (Byzantine tone) and Eucharistic Prayer (sacramentary tone).

Marty said...

Here in Fort Collins, CO, at St. Joseph's, we chant the Kyrie in Greek and the Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent and have done so since our new priest arrived several years ago. Me thinks Archbishop Chaput has quite a bit of influence in this regard, (Thank God!).

Vivat Jesus

Austin Welsh said...

During Advent and Lent Fr John Antony of St Raphael's parish in Springdale, Arkansas, has the Kyrie, Sanctus and Agnus Dei chanted. Just to the south the neighboring parish of St Joseph's in Fayetteville has a Gregorian schola at every Saturday vigil Mass, I am told. The schola's website is: http://comp.uark.edu/~rlee/chant.html

Don Roberts said...

Our parish, St. Margaret Mary in Oakland, CA has a Novus Ordo Latin High Mass every Sunday at 10:30 a.m. It is one of the two most heavily-attended Masses in our parish (the other is the Tridentine High Mass at 12:30 p.m.). St. Margaret Mary's is a great parish: very orthodox and vigorously supportive of homeschooling families. Not at all what you'd expect in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Anonymous said...

In Vancouver, British Columbia, St Jude's Parish and Shrine, under its pastor, Fr Lawrence Donnelly, has been using some Latin and Gregorian chant in its Sunday Masses. This article contains Fr Donnelly's comments about music in liturgy.

SoonerScotty said...

St. Clement Eucharistic Shrine in the Archdiocese of Boston is a great traditional, true to the Church parish administered for the Archdioces by the Oblates of the Virgin Mary a fine order of priests loyal to the Holy Father.

Anthony said...

St Matthew's in Dix Hills, NY has a 9:00 AM Latin chant Mass every Sunday.

smrcc.org

Anonymous said...

Bedford, Virginia:

Saturday evenings we use Gregorian Kyrie, Gloria (Latin); Sanctus (Latin); Agnus Dei (Latin);

Matthew said...

Holy Rosary Church in Portland, Oregon

Jeffrey Smith said...

Immaculate Conception Parish, in Old South End, Toledo chants the Kyrie, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei during Lent. Oddly enough, everyone seems to do it better than the newer tunes used during the rest of the year.

Anonymous said...

My parish, Immaculate Heart of Mary in Anderson Township (eastern Cincinnati, OH)has been singing the Kyrie during Lent.

Jonathan McLear said...

My parish sings the following in Latin during Lent at ALL Masses, even the Mass with guitars:
-Kyrie (Greek, acutally)
-Sanctus
-Mysterium Fidei
-Agnus Dei

During the rest of the year, the Schola sings the Introit, Gloria, and Communio in Latin in addition to everything listed above. They also have an extensive repertoire of Latin Hymns and Motets.

To see specific selections, check out the various lists and audio samples on the church website:
http://www.holycross-batavia.org/music

Pax,
Jon McLear
Director of Music
Holy Cross Catholic Church
Batavia, Illinois

Fr. Augustine Thompson O.P. said...

Hello, Fr. Fox! In case you don't remember, I'm the "congenial Dominican" from last summer's CUA music conference.

Here at St. Thomas Aquinas University Parish in Charlottesville VA, we sing the entire Ordinary (including the Credo) and the Communion Verse every Sunday at the 7:30 a.m. Mass. We have a repertoire of 5 Gregorian ordinaries which change by feast and season. Most of the time two chanters sing the Offertory as well. Occasionally we do other chants in place of the English hymns.

Our new music director introduced the "Jubilate Deo" Kyrie, Sanctus, and Agnus individually and ad hoc at the other Masses for Lent. This will probably continue in some form.

No one at 7:30 has complained about the chant--they all seem to like it. There have been a couple of "are we going backwards" comments at the other Masses but there seems to be no real resistence to the introduction of occasional chants there either.

Fr. Augustine Thompson O.P. said...

Oh, I should have mentioned that the St. Thomas Aquinas Gregorian Schola has also sung Solemn High Mass in the old Dominican Rite (with all the propers) on two occasions--last Assumption and last Monday evening for the solemnity of St. Joseph.

Holy Rosary Church in Portland OR also has occasional celebrations of the Dominican Rite, either low Mass or Simple High Mass, rather than with deacon and subdeacon as we did. There choir "Cantores in Ecclesia" is spectacular.

All of these Masses were with proper permissions.

Anonymous said...

Those in Toronto, Ontario should visit St. Michael's Cathedral especially during the regular school year. Latin is used frequently in the antiphons and motets sung by the choirs at the Saturday afternoon and Sunday masses. Music is provided by St. Michael's Choir School.

Ignatius said...

The St. Lawrence Center at the University of Kansas campus regularly uses Latin Sanctus and Agnus Dei during all of their Masses. Occasionally, at the 5 pm Sunday Mass, they do all the propers in Gregorian.

Anonymous said...

Our parish chants the Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent. I asked out pastor if we could expect the Sanctus to make an appearance this year. He said he tried it last year and people complained about too much Latin :(

M J said...

St. Mary's, David City, Nebraska is chanting the Pater Noster in Latin during Lent. Let's hope it continues after Lent is over.

Diana Silva said...

Ave Maria University in Naples Florida has a Sunday 10 AM Novus Ordo Latin Mass with sung Ordo, Ordinary and Propers. The women's and men's scholas chant, and the university choirs sing polyphony. During high season, it's standing room only, and the people in the pews sing the roof off, especially the Credo! We also have this for feast days. We have 3 weekday N.O. Latin Masses with chanted ordinary. Every student gets some training in Gregorian chant, and we offer a Gregorian chant study week in Solesmes. Thanks for taking this survey!

Anonymous said...

St. Anthony on Milwaukee's South Side regularly employs chant at the 10:00 a.m. Sunday Mass, and on the first Sunday of the month the whole ordinary is chanted in Latin. You'll also encounter some great polyphonic pieces as at last week's liturgy for Laetare Sunday. Father will frequently intersperse a Latin canon here and there on a given day, or the Pater Noster, etc. Solemnities, First Fridays, big feasts, and funerals get the same treatment.

Anonymous said...

Old St Patrick's in Ann Arbor, MI occasionally chants the Agnus Dei and the Sanctus in Latin (more frequently in Lent) and the pastor even says the "Ecce Agnus Dei qui tollit..." in Latin fairly frequently now.

Anonymous said...

St Agnes Church in NYC (43rd Street & Lex) does a beautiful Mass at 11:00 on Sundays (Tridentine Rite). The pastor, Fr. Richard Adams says the mass once in a while, but priests from the Confraternity of St. Peter usually preside. The Church of Our Saviour on 38th and Park does a high Novus Ordo at 11:00, as well. The sound system is awful, but if you have patience for 30 minute sermons, Fr. George Rutler does remind one of a C.S. Lewis/G.K. Chesterton hybrid(humor, wit, intellectual brilliance).

Both merit a trip to the city, and our support.

BCatholic said...

At Boston College, the daily Mass has had Latin chant of the Agnus Dei and sanctus for Lent.

Daisy said...

Wow, Ignatius, I'm so happy to hear that about St. Lawrence. I went there when I was a student at KU, and although I don't remember much Latin or Greek in the ceremony, Fr. Krische was instrumental in returning me to the fullness of the Faith.

At Our Lady of Good Counsel in Kansas City, MO, the Kyrie is always in Greek, and the Gloria (when applicable), Agnus Dei, and Sanctus are always in Latin. The Our Father is chanted, but in English.

Daisy

Peter John(son) said...

My parish, St. Joseph's in Jim Thorpe, PA uses Latin during Advent and Lent. Traditional Kyrie, Opening antiphon in Latin, Gloria in Latin, Sactus in Latin, Agnus Dei in Latin, and usually one Latin Hymn. Also incense is typically used during these two seasons as well. The Eucharistic prayers, although in English,, are often chanted as well.

melanie b said...

My parents' parish, where I grew up, St Louis in Austin, Tx has regular appearances of Latin. Angus Dei, Sanctus, and various hymns in regular Sunday masses. With special additions in Advent, Lent, Christmas, Easter, etc.

Sadly, my current parish in MA does not.

Anonymous said...

St. Patrick's in New Orleans has an indult Mass every Sunday morning, followed at 11.00 am by a solemn Mass in the Novus Ordo, at which incense is always used and the Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Pater Noster, Agnus Dei, and Ite Missa Est are chanted in the ancient languages.

Anonymous said...

Mary Our Queen in Norcross, Georgia chants the Kyrie in Greek and the Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin during Advent and Lent. Also, the Communion proper is chanted in Latin year-round.

Fr Smith said...

St Mary's in Greenville, South Carolina has had a lot of press for Latin in the liturgy, but our use of it is much more modest than what the press would have us believe. My First Mass was all in Latin (New Rite) and the Choir did a mix between De Angelis and Palestrina's Missa aeterna Christi munera. The parish Solemn Mass at 11am has a Latin Ordinary (with a recited English Credo, lamentably) which was de Angelis outside of the tempi forti and Primitiva in Advent and Lent. While Fr JS Newman, the pastor, was away, I as the Administrator, wanted to give him a surprise upon his arrival after his sabbatical by teaching the 11am crowd the Orbis Factor. The cat's out of the bag now, but the people have doing it since November and doing a great job of it. For the Vigil Mass and the 9am Family Mass we have the Missa primitiva during tempi forti. My forays into doing Latin at the 5pm Spanish Mass proved to singularly unsuccessful; we had a painful Pange lingua at Holy Thursday last year, so I am waiting for some more musical support for that one. No Latin Glorias or Credos at any mass. But, that having been said, the people do sing the Ordinaries in Latin and in the vulgar tongue with great gusto. What I have learned as a pastor is this: if you want the people to sing it, introduce it and teach it yourself before Mass, and reinforce it by haing it constantly. And also, if the children get on board, then all the better. Only problem is that our parents like to hear their little ones at the 9am Mass do the Latin, so they won't sing, so I have to scowl at them sometimes! But over all, not a bad beginning!

mrsdarwin said...

During Lent, St. Elizabeth's in Pflugerville, TX, sings the Kyrie, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei (at least at the 11:30 Mass). We also sing the Our Father in a chant-style setting year-round.

Fr. Christensen said...

Holy Spirit Parish in Sioux Falls, SD uses Latin in daily Masses and during some seasons on Sundays as well.

Stephen M. Collins said...

#1 My former parish in Houston, Our Lady of Walsingham (Anglican Use), still has a Rite I 8:15 Mass every Sunday, at which the Ordinary is chanted in Latin by the entire congregation, lead by one lady cantor. They now want to add the Credo to the mix, so we're looking at possibly the Ambrosian Credo, and even introducing the Ambrosian Gloria for a change of pace. I still work with them on some aspects of music in the parish, including setting the Lectionary texts (RSV-RC) to the Graduale tones.

#2 I am now Associte Musician at Stella Maris in Charleston (Sullivan's Island), SC. Under Scott Atwood's leadership, we chant the Sanctus and Agnues Dei from Mass XVIII some season (including the Memorial Acclamation in Latin), and the Glria VIII (de Angelis) other seasons. During Lent we (the congregation) chants the Introit in English to Tonus Peregrinus. Sequences are used (in English) for Easter, Pentecost, and Corpus Christi in their chanted forms. This past Advent, we included the Pater Noster. This is all at the regular Sunday/Holyday Masses. We also have a weekly Indult Mass, but it's usually a Low Mass with hymns. I play for that Mass and prepare the worship aids which include the transaltions and hymnody. The hymns are mostly in English, but there are about a dozen favorite Latin hymns that the congregation sings quite well on.

Anonymous said...

Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, also in Sioux Falls, SD uses alot of Latin regularly as a way to unite the English speaking parishioners with the Spanish speaking parishioners.

Katherine Christensen said...

At St Clare's in Berea, KY, we sing the Kyrie in Greek during Lent, but the music varies from chant to the settings that go with various Haugen Mass settings. (I use chant when I cantor.) At the Saturday evening Mass, I sometimes use a chant Sanctus or Agnus Dei, but I'm the only cantor who does. (The pastor is OK with a bit of Latin, but does not especially encourage it.)

Dale said...

St. Andrew the Apostle Parish, Clifton, VA
Arlington Diocese
10:30 AM High Mass

Confiteor, Kyrie, Sanctus, Roman Canon - First Eucharistic Prayer, Pater Noster, Agnus Dei - we get it all in Latin and Greek. Church is packed - sometimes people standing in the back to attend this Mass.

Joe C said...

St Thomas the Apostle, Ann Arbor, MI, Diocese of Lansing. We use various Latin Mass parts, with the most at the 12:30 "sorta high Mass."

Anonymous said...

The Sunday noon Mass at (Dominican-run) St. Mary's in New Haven, CT has the Gloria, Credo, Pater Noster, Agnus Dei, etc. with beautiful chant to boot. And incense! Year round.

The 10am Sunday Mass at Ave Maria University in Naples, FL features all of the above, plus the priest ad orientem.

Bender said...

Blessed Sacrament, Alexandria, Virginia chants the Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent (and perhaps can be persuaded to expand the use of Latin to other parts and throughout the year).

St. Mary's, Alexandria, Virginia has a monthly Latin Mass, and occasional use of Latin during other English Masses, plus Latin lessons on their webpage.

St. Matthew's Cathedral, Washington, D.C. has a weekly Latin Mass, and frequently uses Gregorian Chant at Mass.

The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception used to have a weekly Latin Mass, and they also sprinkled Latin here and there, but I haven't been there in a while.

Anonymous said...

Holy Ghost in Denver, Colorado uses Latin on Sundays at 10:00, all of the propers and readings, including prefaces are in English, everything else is in Latin. The priests almost always use Eucharstic Prayer 2. However, for Advent and Lent we have had the Proper Intoit and Communion Antiphon in chant. Also for Lent the Pastor has been using the Asperges Rite in Latin. Holy Ghost has a long tradition of Latin though, it is not something new here.

Skip & Cindy said...

Our Lady of Guadalupe, Silvis, IL
Diocese of Peoria

We use chant for the ordinaries during Lent, Advent, and about 1/3 of Ordinary Time. During Holy Week we have a Tenebrae service with the musicial settings all in Chant. (Dies Irae, De Profundis, Benedictus, Miserere mei Deus) We often use Adoro te devote during Holy Communion. Hymns are also frequently sung in Latin, especially on the Solemnities of Mary and the Saints.

Diane said...

Assumption Grotto in Detroit - truly one of the leaders in this area. The parish has had a full blown Latin Novus Ordo at 9:30 each Sunday for several years now. It was originally done by the previous pastor, Msgr Clifford Sawher once monthly. But when Fr. Eduard Perrone came, he eventually shifted to weekly - probably some 4-5 years ago.

Our 7:30am and 8:30am weekday and Saturday morning liturgies Latin Novus Ordo's as well.

Furthermore, a few years back, Fr. Perrone catechized the parish on the ad orientem posture, explaining the spirituality associated with it. He told the congregation that one Sunday they would see him come out and face the other direction. He has been doing it ever since.

We have some excellent booklets for the Latin liturgy with solid translations on the facing page. All four Eucharistic Prayers are used, with Eucharistic Prayer 1 dominating. I have never noticed the beauty of these EP's until I needed to follow along in those booklets.

Many examples of the liturgy are found in the various photo posts on my blog, which is the UNOFFICIAL blog of Assumption Grotto.

Deo Gratias!!!

Anonymous said...

Sorry to say that in my small-town Canadian parish, the only time Latin is used is on Holy Thursday(the Gloria, Kyrie, and Pange Lingua). Neither of our choir directors know anything beyond H/H and St. Louis Jesuits, and they rely on the resident fogy (me, the organist) to show correct Latin pronunciation. Depressing and frustrating.

Anonymous said...

Franciscan University of Steubenville, OH has a monthly Latin Mass on Tuesday evenings with sung Ordinary and Propers. The schola also sings once a month on Sundays, on which occasions the Ordinary and some of the propers are chanted in Latin.

Anonymous said...

For those of us in the Washington, D.C./Northern Virginia Area, or for those of you visiting - there are several options. The first is perhaps the most beautiful Solemn Latin Novus Ordo you could attend outside of St. Peter's Basilica - at 12 noon at my now-adopted parish of St. John the Beloved in McLean, VA. If liturgy could get any highger, you would bump your head on the stratosphere. Full gregorian propers, the ordinary sung with the Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus and Agnus Dei using polyphony by the great masters. The Liturgy of the Eucharist is offered ad orientem. It is an oasis in the desert. A Tridentine Low Mass is offered at St. Mary Mother of God Parish in downtown DC, in the Chinatown neighborhood close to the Judiciary Square Metro station. Masses are at 9 a.m. - with one monthly 5:00 p.m. Solemn High Mass. There is a 10 a.m. Latin Novus Ordo at St. Matthew's Cathedral, also in downtwon DC - it is versus populum, but it is well attended and very decently celebrated. There are also indult Tridentine Masses offered in Silver Spring, MD and Alexandria, VA - but I have never attended them and don't know what time they are offered. I know that several other parishes in the Diocese of Arlington, Virginia offer Latin Novus Ordos or Masses in the Vernacular with chant or parts sung in Latin, but they are happily too numerous to list - maybe others can contribute what they know.

Mark Wyman said...

Holy Family, an Oratorian Parish in Toronto, Ontario, has an all-latin novus ordo Mass every Sunday, and includes some parts of the Mass in Latin in all of their other Masses, both at Holy Family and their other parish, St. Vincent de Paul. Both parishes feature chant in both Latin and English.

In the Diocese of Lake Charles, Louisiana, the parish of Sacred Heart of Jesus in Creole, LA, regularly has parts of the Mass in Latin (though that congregation is presently enduring a hurricane-caused sojurn at another parish, St. Patrick in Sweetlake, LA; their use of Latin continues in their temporary home, however). Chant is also employed in this parish.

The newly-appointed Bishop of Lake Charles, Mgr. Glen Provost, was using Latin for parts of the Mass at his previous parish, Our Lady of Fatima, in Lafayette, La. He has had chant in his Sunday high Masses for some time now.

Also in the Diocese of Lafayette, La., parts of the Mass are said in Latin and chant is sung in the parishes of St. Joseph and St. Louis in Parks, La.

Diane said...

I should also add that Gregorian Chant is a staple at all Masses - English and Latin - at Assumption Grotto.

The weekday liturgy masses in the AM also include latin chant.

Sundays feature a mix of sacred polyphony and chant.

During Christmas and Easter Seasons, we have Orchestral masses, with Fr. Perrone conducting. This Easter and Divine Mercy Sunday will feature a Mass written by Paul Paray for the 500th Anniversary of Joan of Arc's death. There will likely be 50+ pieces, and a larger choir than usual. For those within a one-tank drive, details will soon be posted at the official Grotto site, as well as the unofficial site. ;)

Anonymous said...

St. Agnes in St. Paul, MN celebrates the a N.O. high mass in Latin every sunday and has a wonderful choir that regularly takes on wonderful mass parts.

francis said...

My parish, St. John Neumann in Gaithersburg, MD (diocese of Washington) began in October the process of making all the responses in (chanted) Latin for the 8am Sunday Mass. Eventually, this will include everything from the Gloria to the Our Father to the Creed.

Christopher said...

Father,

As a student at the Catholic University of America, in DC. I know there is the Cathedral down town, St. Matthew's that offers a gregorian mass (novus odro) and has a beautiful schola. At our university masses, we often use the simple angus dei, sanctus and kyrie, and after adoration on wednesday nights we use the Salve Regina and other marian hymns (chant) depending of the litugical season. Everyone knows the hymns by heart now. Finally the National Shrine of the Immaculate conception does alot of chant. Their Sunday mass often has the Intriots and Communion antiphonts in Latin and Chanted, just to mention a little.

Anonymous said...

Stamford, CT at St. John the Evangelist...high mass every Sunday 12 noon. Latin Novus Ordo, ad orientum, lots and lots of altar boys, incense every time, altar rail if you prefer, no EM's...all this and the incomparable Scott Turkington as choir master. So we get Gregorian chant, Palestrina, Mozart, Haydn, etc. etc. I mean, really, it's perfect.

-KH

Roman Sacristan said...

Saint William Catholic Church in Greenville, Texas.
For the last three years there's one Novus Ordo Latin Mass every Sunday. Major solemnities are also usually in Latin.
For the Triduum there is as much Latin as possible (translations are always provided for both English and Spanish speakers).

Anonymous said...

Prince of Peace in Greenville, SC usually does the Kyrie in Greek and the Agnus Dei in Latin. Our priest, Fr. Brovey also tries to incorporate Latin in through the prayers, blessings, and the hymns. It's a great church!

margaret friedrich said...

I am a cantor at Sacred Heart parish in Patterson, CA. We use the traditional Greek Kyrie and the Latin Sanctus and Agnus Dei during Lent. We also sing some Latin hymns, typically the Panis Angelicus, and I sang the Parce Domine at our Penance service. Also, St. Joseph's Church in Modesto, CA uses the Latin responses, and the pastor, Fr. Joseph Ilo, says some parts of the Mass in Latin, at every 9 a.m. Mass on Sundays.

In our parish, Sacred Heart, it is definitely an uphill battle --- but some of us hang in there! We are part of the Stockton Diocese.

Anonymous said...

Masses at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, DC, sings the Agnus Dei in Latin year round.

Anonymous said...

At St.Thomas More, the catholic chapel at Yale, one of the priests regularly leads the Agnus in Latin during workday masses.

Dan said...

I haven't read all the comments, so forgive me if this is a repeat, but during Lent Agnus Dei has been chanted at every noon day Mass at the Our Lady of Angels Cathedral in Los Angeles. I don't know if this practice extends beyond Lent or not.

Anonymous said...

St. John in Foley, MN and Sts. Peter and in neighboring Gilman, MN have both been chanting the Agnus Dei this Lent. Diocese of St Cloud!

kcpriest said...

St. James Parish in St. Joseph, MO

We use the Greek/latin Mass parts (Kyrie, Sanctus, Agnus Dei) compiled in the booklet (Jubilate Deo) during much of the year. During Christmas and Easter seasons, we usually opt for English settings because the Jubilate Deo parts mentioned above are actually taken from the Gregorian Requiem and seem out of place during times of great jubilation. As we develop a chant choir and schola, it is my hope to learn other Latin settings so that we can use them during those two seasons. Some people are quite happy with it, others wish we used no Latin. Overall the parish is content.

Pespodatus said...

If you have a Gregorian Schola of some sort, please consider registering at the Church Music Association of America's National Registry of Gregorian Scholas. It's wonderful to see how many there are, all over the country, and how they are increasing!

Anonymous said...

St. Veronica, Chantilly, Virginia

Look around the liturgy, music, and store pages.

Nicholas said...

My choir (http://nhaggin.freeshell.org/champaignschola/) sings without regular schedule at the parishes in Champaign-Urbana, IL; our next appearance is this coming Sunday.

St. John's Catholic Chapel (UIUC Newman) has its own schola that does a weekly 1970 Rite Mass in Latin, which IIRC is now on Wednesdays at 5 PM again.

MissJean said...

The Sanctus and Agnus Dei were sung at Masses at St. Joseph's in Port Huron, MI (last year, before Father died) and at Masses I attended during the summer at the St. Peter's Cathedral in Marquette, MI.

ElaineT said...

Resurrection Catholic Church, Sunnyvale, CA: We've been singing the Kyrie in Greek and the Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent.

I've asked if we could do more of this.

A nearby parish, Our Lady of Peace, has sung the Kyrie in in Greek, the Sanctus, and the Agnus Dei in Latin. MAybe more, but it's been a while since I've been to one of their services. They also do a Latin Mass once I month.

Anonymous said...

Our Lady of Lourdes in Philly offers a full-Latin, ad orientem Mass with Gregorian chant and polyphony. Ran by the Mercedarian Friars.

Little Gidding said...

Holy Spirit Catholic Church in Annandale, VA, in the Diocese of Arlington, has been incorporating more and more Latin, giving it a try with all Masses one Sunday each month so far. Last time we added the Pater Noster to the Agnus Dei and the Sanctus. During the peace, I also greeted my neighbors with Pax Vobiscum and they seemed pleasantly amused.

Sherry W said...

I've been to tons of parishes that incorporate bits of Latin in the liturgy. It is quite common.

My old parish, Blessed Sacrament, in Seattle did so regularly - the Agnus Dei and the Gloria, most frequently.

That's why I was ready to roll when my current parish, Holy Apostles in Colorado Springs used the Latin version of both last Sunday. And Holy Apostles is not traditionalist.

We've used Latin, English, and Ukranian all in the same Mass several times (the parish is heavily involved in supporting Catholic parishes in the Ukraine).

Brad Harvey said...

My parish, Immaculate Conception in Kenton, OH chants the Sanctus and Agnus Dei during Lent. I`m hoping this leads to more.

Anonymous said...

As requsted, here's the web site of St. Patrick's in New Orleans. For the record, like the 9.30 Sunday indult Mass, the heavily Latinised 11.00 Novus Ordo Mass is celebrated ad orientem.

Emily said...

St. Ignatus Loyola Church in NYC (84th and Park) has the Kyrie in Greek year-round and kneeling during Lent. Some contemporary music at communion but all traditional for the entrance and dissmissal. http://www.saintignatiusloyola.org/

For those further upstate in New York. St. Francis of Assisi in Aurburn has the Our Father, Sanctus, Agnus Dei, and the memorial acclamation in Latin chant. http://www.catholic-church.org/stfrancis-auburn/
They had all this when Fr. DeBellis was there, I hope the tradition has continued.

KC said...

At my parish:

St. Jude the Apostle
Westlake Village, CA
http://www.stjudeswv.org/
Los Angeles diocese (yes, really!!)

during Advent and Lent, we sing the
Kyrie,
Agnus Dei,
Sanctus,
and the Proclamation during the Eucharistic Prayer (forgive me but I do not know the official name of this prayer).

These are sung by the congregation as led by the cantor and accompanied by the organ. (Is it still chant if it's not a cappella?)

So far as I know, these are sung at all the Masses.

Jonathan said...

The Basilica of the Sacred Heart at the University of Notre Dame has introduced the Latin Sanctus and Agnus Dei at the 5:30 pm Mass during Lent. The dorm chapel that I attend also regularly employs these two chants along with the Kyrie.

Anonymous said...

My parish is now using Latin in a couple places and I have a renewed appreciation for the venacular.

No wonder people in pre-Vatican II days just spent the whole mass in private devotions.

The Latin suddenly showed up one Sunday - no explanation or teaching or pronunciation guide or missal help - and so I'm left just mentally trying to transcribe what the words mean, since saying words that have no meaning seems a bit pointless.

Dan of the Holy Whapping said...

At Our Lady of Mount Carmel on the north side of Chicago, we sing choral settings of the Kyrie, Gloria, and Agnus Dei in Latin almost every week. Additionally, we sing the plainchant Sanctus during Advent and Lent, and the Credo in Latin during Advent. Other chunks of Latin come in during important feast days, especially Holy Week.

John Gibson said...

Corpus Christi Parish in Colorado Springs uses latin and chant on the 3rd Saturday of each month at 5 p.m. Mass. We sing the ordinary parts in latin using Jubilate Deo, we have several pslam tones we use for the propers, and sing hymns in parts from the Adoremus hymnal. We hope to expand to more Masses in the future!

Sarah said...

St. John the Evangelist parish in Fenton, Michigan chants the Kyrie, Sanctus and Agnus Dei during Lenten Sunday Masses.

LeeAnn said...

My home parish doesn't but I visited St. Mary's in Anacortes, Washington state, and I know they do at least the Kyrie in Greek and the Agnus Dei in Latin every Sunday and probably more. They have a combination of Latin hymns sung by the choir and English hymns sung by the assembly. A really, really lovely church and a dynamic young Vietnamese-American pastor. I wish they had a (functioning) website.

Anonymous said...

Schola Web Page for Charlottesville VA above: http://www.st-thomas-aquinas.org/schola.php

moconnor said...

St. Francis Xavier in Gettysburg, PA uses the Latin Ordinary for Lent. This year we even included the Memorial Acclamation. It takes a couple of years to do this but folks do get it after a bit. During the year we sing the occasional latin choral motet.

Matthew said...

My parish, the Church of Our Saviour at 39th Street in NYC (home to well-known author and homilist Fr. Rutler) does its Sunday solemn mass in English, but with the Mass Parts, Introit and Graduale sung in Latin, and other parts of the mass such as the collects, Gospel, Prayers of the Faithful and Preface sung in English. The Graduale is, I think, some sort of seasonal version, while the variable Introit is usually sung to the same melody. The choir is small and fairly informal but has a nice repertoire of English and Latin motets; in general, it is a really good example of how a parish with comparatively few resources can accomplish a good deal with foresight.

Henry said...

Knoxville Catholic High School has a monthly Latin Novus Ordo -- Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Pater Noster, Agnus Dei, Memorial Acclamation and dialog responses sung by all; introit, collect, super oblata, preface, communion antiphon, and postcommunion chanted in Latin by the celebrant.

Jared Olar said...

At St. Joseph's Parish in Pekin, Illinois, we do the Kyrie in Greek and the Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent. Outside of Lent, however, there's hardly any Latin during Mass.

At St. Mary's Cathedral in Peoria, there is a Latin Novus Ordo on Saturday at 4 p.m.

Michael in ArchDen said...

My parish, Our Lady of Fatima in Lakewood, Colorado (Archdiocese of Denver)uses the Agnus Dei and Sanctus in latin during Lent and Advent. Started about 2 years ago. I always tease the choir director that it doesn't seem very penitential to get to enjoy the Latin in those penitential seasons! Maybe one day they'll flip it, and we'll have to suffer through an english "Holy, Holy, Holy" only during Lent and Advent. ;-)

Anonymous said...

St. Peter's in Steubenville regularly does the Kyrie in Greek and the Agnus Dei and Sanctus in Latin. Occasionally we do the Gloria in Latin as well, and almost always sing a Latin recessional hymn. This year during Lent, Franciscan University is doing the Agnus Dei in Latin at every noon Mass, and most days is doing the Sanctus in Latin and the Kyrie in Greek, also at the noon Masses. I can't speak to the other Mass times.

Jared Olar said...

I should also have mentioned that at Sunday Masses at St. Mary's Cathedral in Peoria, there is often a schola that chants the Introit and the Communion in Latin. The diocese has made known that it favors the inclusion of more Latin during Mass. Not everyone in the diocese agrees, of course.

Leguleius Magnus said...

Our Lady of Lourdes in Philadelphia, PA (63rd and Lancaster) does the novus ordo entirely in Latin, ad orientem, every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. English is used only for the readings and prayer of the faithful. Almost every Sunday the ordinary and propers are sung in Gregorian chant.

Eric said...

My parish, Holy Apostles in Colorado Springs, does the Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin-- but only for Lent, which seems a bit odd. I've asked Father to extend it to the rest of the year, but he hasn't replied to my email.

David Nowaczewski said...

Ss. Cyril & Methodius, Sterling Heights, Michigan

chanted Latin propers (Gloria, Sanctus, Agnus Dei) and Greek Kyrie from time to time at the 9:30 am Sunday Mass. More often during Lent (with the exception of the Gloria).

Also has a 9 am Wed Mass in Latin

St. Joseph, Detroit, Michigan

10 (or 10:30) am Sunday Mass - latin with polyphony/chant
Also Latin Mass on Monday and Tuesday. Wednesday Mass in English, with Latin/Greek propers.
All Masses I've been to have been ad orientem.

Paul Smith Jr. said...

St Anthony of Padua in Wilmington, Delaware uses the Letin for the Agnus Dei and Greek for the Kyrie.

Kimberly said...

At my parish, Holy Cross in Garrett Park, MD (near DC) we are blessed to have a couple of fantastic priests and a wonderful music director. We sing the Agnus Dei all year round, a chant-based version of the Confiteor, and now during Lent, chant for the processional. Sometimes the cantor or choir will sing chant or Latin verse from the choir loft during communion. I think it's beautiful and I must admit (sorry to insert an opinion here) I feel much more comfortable with this solemn, reverential version of the Novus mass than at old rite masses I've attended.

Greg Popcak said...

In my current parish (Holy Family, Steubenville, O) we do the Kyrie, and then the Sanctus, and Agnus Dei in Latin. Prior to lent, we also learned the Gloria. It's a parish with a lot of families who have a long history in the charistmatic movement and are open to praise and worship type music as well, but the people seem to love it and sing all the Latin responses strongly and reverently.

In my previous parish (St. Agnes, Mingo Jct, Ohio), I took it upon myself as music director to introduce Latin responses to the congregation. I taught them all of the above plus the memorial acclamation. This parish was more of a "joe Catholic" working class parish than the one I'm in now, but eveyone sang, and the kids especially seemed to think it was cool to be able to pray in a different language.

Anonymous said...

The Calvert House Catholic ministry at University of Chicago uses the Latin Gloria, Sanctus, Mysterium fidei, Pater Noster, and Agnus Dei (I might be missing something) and the Greek Kyrie at its 11am Sunday Mass. The 11:15 PM mass at Georgetown uses the Latin Sanctus and Agnus Dei, or at least it did a couple years ago last time I was there.

moconnor said...

I'm not sure if anyone mentioned this, but the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in DC does a Latin novus ordo Mass in the crypt church at 1:30 (unless the schedule has changed)

Lyn F. said...

At Immaculate Conception Parish in Durham, NC, we're currently chanting the Agnus Dei XVIII in Latin. Occasionally, the Kyrie is chanted in Greek. There is also the occasional Latin motet; in fact, for an Evening Prayer next Tuesday, the Chamber Choir will be singing Kuhnau's Tristis est Anima Mea and Bruckner's Christus factus est.

At one Mass, Lent I, Attende Domine was the Communion hymn. Cantor chanted the verses a cappella, and the people chanted the refrain.

Robert said...

Notre Dame parish in Bethlehem, PA says a Latin Novus Ordo monthly

Jake the Acolyte said...

Holy Rosary in Houston, TX says 9:30 Sunday morning Mass in Latin (minus the readings, of course). I've been going there off and on while attending Rice U for the last 3 years, and the congregation seems to have doubled in size during that time.

Rich Leonardi said...

The Latin suddenly showed up one Sunday - no explanation or teaching or pronunciation guide or missal help - and so I'm left just mentally trying to transcribe what the words mean, since saying words that have no meaning seems a bit pointless.

How difficult could it be? You already know the English translation and, presumably, the flow of the Mass.

PhiMuAlpha2681 said...

At St. Patrick Cathedral, Harrisburg, PA, we use the Sanctus XVIII and Agnus Dei XVIII during Advent in Lent, the Kyrie at various times throughout the year and at all Masses where the Bishop is Celebrant (as he prefers the Confiteor and sung Kyrie over other forms of the Act of Penitence), the Pater Noster during Lent, and the Gloria VIII on some occasions. Bishop also expects the Vidi Aquam chant for the sprinkling at the Easter Vigil, and Pange Lingua at Holy Thurs (not that I would use anything else). The pastor has made noises about expanding the use of the Pater Noster. My choir also has a substantial amount of Latin motets and anthems in its repertoire.

Stephen said...

St. Mary's in New Haven has a schola cantorum for the Ordinary in Latin every sunday noon Mass.

Friday's daily mass is usually with the Ordinary in Latin.

Holy Week sees the schola use some very impressive settings such as Mozart's Coronation Mass.

http://www.stmarys-priory.com/

Pedro Martinez said...

My parish in Melbourne Beach, FL was using Latin for the Gloria (VIII) in solemnities, the Sanctus and Agnus Dei on sundays (XVIII). A small schola of four would sing the communion antiphon on occasion; also some simple polyphonic motets for after communion. We put together a small booklet with mass VIII and XVIII and Credo III, and ten simple chants like Salve Regina, Regina Caeli, etc. We included a selection of quotes from Vatican documents encouraging the use of Latin, from Sacrosanctum Consilium to the recent ones. We'd also sing some hymns like Iesu Dulcis Memoria, and the sequences for Easter, Pentecost, and Corpus Christi, all in the context of mosty English and the N.O.
One day the pastor came and said "No more Latin", the explanation being that we were alienating the young people. The music director left and the replacement introduced Haas, Haugen and Coonie music instead. they have dumped even the English psalmody of Response & Acclaim. A very sad story. As far as I know, Latin is not in use at all in the Diocese of Orlando.

Pope_St_Peter said...

Father,

Fr. Paul Weinberger in Dallas has been celebrating the a Latin Novus Ordo for about a decade now. He was at Blessed Sacrament parish in Oak Cliff for many of those years, but then was moved to St. William the Confessor in Greenville, TX.

www.saintwilliamtheconfessor.com

Bede said...

My parish, St. Patrick's in Tacoma, WA, sings the Kyrie in Greek and chants the Agnus Dei in Latin.

Thus far, we have only done this in Lent, but there is a movement afoot in the Liturgy committee to have this be the norm.

Sadly, it appears that our primary obstacles are the chair of the committee and the musical director. The pastor has voiced no opinion.

Anonymous said...

We occasionally sing the Agnus Dei (esp. during Lent), as well as some 1970s hymns in Latin -- Jubilate Deo, etc. We also use the Kryrie (Greek, I know) from time to time. However, we used to be much more traditional under the direction of our now-retired monsignor. We've been moving into Cardinal Mahony's Gather Together fold under our current priest/ administrator. Ss. Felicitas & Perpetua Church, San Marino, Calif.

Tom Weber said...

Corpus Christi in Galesburg, IL uses Latin frequently for the Sanctus and Agnus Dei, and Greek Kryie.
St. Mary of the Woods in Princeville, IL uses Latin in both Novus Ordo and Tridentine Masses.
St. John Cantius in Chicago has Latin Novus Ordo Masses as well as Tridentine.
The Community of St. John near Princeville, IL uses Latin at various times.
Holy Family in West Seattle uses Latin at 8am and on Tuesday evening.
Holy Rosary in Portland, OR uses Latin extensively.
St. Mary of the Angels in Chicago uses a bit sporadically.
St. Gregory the Great in Chicago uses a little bit.

Arnold said...

My parish is St. James Cathedral in Seattle. During Lent we chant/sing the Kyrie, Credo, Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Greek/Latin. The Communion antiphon is always chanted in Latin.
During the rest of the year we often chant or sing the Kyrie, Sanctus and Agnus Dei in the original language. The excellent choir (50 plus voices) often sings hymns and motets etc. composed in Latin. Even an occasional Rachmoninov piece in English or once, the original Slavonic. We are spoiled. And all of this in a liberal parish, but luckily the pastor is a musician and loves liturgy.

Mary Jane said...

I am the music director at Our Lady of Good Counsel Cchurch, St. Augustine, Florida. Every week we use the standard chant Agnus Dei. We will also chant the antiphon for Palm Sunday in Latin. Baby steps? Yes, but you should have seen where they were before. I plan to add a Latin chant Sanctus, probably during the summer because I don't want people to make an automatic association between chant and Latin and "penitential" seasons.

Tom Weber said...

I'm not sure where the chapel is, but Gonzaga University has a Gregorian Schola that sings regularly for Mass. Their director is an oblate of Solesmes and teaches a chant workshop at USML Mundelein each summer.

Therese Z said...

St. Petronille Church, Glen Ellyn Illinois, says or chants the Kyrie at some Sunday Masses, and sings the Agnus Dei at all Sunday Masses to the standard "Agnus Day-ay-ee" chant, with the extra verses to cover the assembly of the communion vessels.

I wish we had more, especially the Sanctus.

Sometimes the choir lets loose with some chant at the big feasts, but not the people.

Anonymous said...

My parish, St. Margaret Mary's in Oakland Ca. offers the Latin Mass (Novus Ordo)10:30AM Sunday (Angelus Missal).

We also offer the Tridentine Mass 7 days a week (with our resident priest from the Christ the King Inst. - 1962 Missal)
We have a mix of choirs (2 adult and 1 childrens)who all sing chant and Latin hymns.

Marc

Anonymous said...

A bit more on Holy Ghost in Denver: at the 11:30 AM Daily Mass during this Lent, we've started using the Sanctus in Latin. Agnus Dei is in Latin about half the time (Lent and otherwise). And of course, the songs for Reposition and Benediction (which happens before and after, respectively, the lunch time Mass) are in Latin as well.

Michael said...

St. Mary Star of the Sea, Bronx, NY. The Agnus Dei and the occasional hymn.

Anonymous said...

Fr., we at small St. John's, Gillett, WI have been introducing some Latin for about 2 years now. So far we sing a call & respond Kyrie (Greek, of course), the Sanctus (just learning now), & Agnus Dei. The latter two are in chant. We use these for the penitential seasons of Advent and Lent. I am the "liturgist"--no formal training, just LOTS of reading of Church documents, and information garnered from some reliable sources. Our former pastor encouraged us to use more Latin but not "too much" (whatever that is. Our new pastor has said that he will have to learn the Latin since he did not have to while in seminary. Many prayers are needed so we can continue to introduce Latin in other parts of the Mass and other liturgies. The choir often sings Latin hymns at Communion, but we hope to get the younger members of the congregation interested and involved. Pray for this.

Deacon John said...

We have two parishes in our area of Central Florida (Lake County) that I attend. St. Mary of the Lakes and St. Patrick's. Both use the Kyrie, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei during Lent.
Deacon John Giglio
http://deaconjohn1987.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

At the Sunday 10:00 am Mass at the cathedral of St. Joseph in Baton Rouge, LA, the congregation chants the Sanctus and Agnus in Latin during Lent. The choir sometimes chants other things: the Pange lingua, Iesu dulcis memoria, Attende Domine, Parce Domine, etc. The choir also sings the classic choral tradition (RC and a lot of Anglican). The director has expressed interest in forming both a parish and diocesan schola.

Our Lady of Mercy parish in Baton Rouge also chants a bit in Latin at its 10:30 Mass, but it's always tossed into the salad with seemingly everything else.

Larry said...

At the Cathedral of the Madeliene in Salt Lake City we are blessed to have the Madeliene Choir School. They sing at the main Mass on Sundays, on Holy Days and Vespers/Benediction on many Sundays. The Introit, Gloria, Creed and Sanctus are all in Latin.

Therese said...

Catholic Student Center, Univ. of Maryland, College Park. Big Noon Mass regularly chants the Agnus Dei and Sanctus in Latin during Lent, except for the Kyrie, which it does in Greek. Latin makes not infrequent appearances other times as well - including the chanting of the Salve every Wednesday at Holy Hour, also the Tantum Ergo, etc. Last year the Good Friday service included the Reproaches chanted in Latin.

Paul said...

An example pretty close to you, Fr. Fox, is St. Mary's in Delaware, OH. The ordinarily rather wretched musical repetoire is supplemented with Latin Sanctus and Agnus Dei during Lent (although, despite posting the missalette page reference to these on the hymn board, the congregation still seems a bit confused). Holy Rosary in Memphis, TN does the same thing, with slightly better results even without the hymn board.

Fr Arsenius said...

"Dabbling"? Not "dabbling", but fully immersed.

There's gotta be a pony in here somewhere!

All the liturgies (Masses, Divine Office, devotions) here are done in Latin with Gregorian propers and ordinaries from the Graduale Romanum (with printed vernacular translations provided). Yes, we use the Missale Romanum (2000), editio typica tertia first promulgated by Pope Paul VI: everything is chanted, save the homily (!).

OK, this is a monastery, not a parish; but still, most of the worshippers come from the local parishes. I believe it's the only location in the entire diocese which employs plainchant on a regular and frequent basis.

Monastery of Annunciation Hermitage
Gilchrist, Oregon USA

Gibbons in SF said...

SS. Peter and Paul in San Francisco has a Mass with Latin (except for readings/homily) the first Sunday of the month. Here is a link to the PDF of the Latin/English translation we give the parishioners: http://www.stspeterpaul.san-francisco.ca.us/church/Latin_mass_translation.pdf

Jeffrey Tucker said...

Auburn, Alabama, the St. Cecilia Schola, Latin Ordinary and motets every week. Parishes in Montgomery, Alabama, and Mobile, also use Latin. This reflects a big shift from, say 5 years ago, when we were considered cutting edge. Now the practice at our parish is rather mainstream, or getting there. There is certainly a growing interest in chant in every parish.

Debbe said...

Annunciation in Houston has TLM and NO Latin every weekend.

Pespodatus said...

Anon

Check out the Church's "Kyriale" for many such settings. An edition is available here for $12.00. The Kyriale is a subset of the Graduale Romanum. Editions of the Graduale can be got from many places, now!

Father Martin Fox said...

For the anonymous who may notice his post is deleted...

Your post solicited suggestions regarding Mass settings; normally, I wouldn't object to that, but in this case, that would "hijack" the very purpose of this thread, as I described originally.

That said, I'll be happy to publish a post soliciting the information you asked for; just not here.

Jeffrey Tucker said...

Whoops, I forgot to add the most unusual thing. Our Schola does two Latin Propers at least. Here, I think we might still be on the cutting edge.

Anonymous said...

My parish is St. Anthony of Padua in Willits, Diocese of Santa Rosa, California. I am the volunteer organist and choir director. We have been singing the kyrie, gloria, sanctus and agnus dei on a fairly regularly basis about half the time. We also have integrated certain Gregorian hymns into the liturgy. The parish priest is supportive of this and occasionally integrates Latin into the Mass. For example, he occasionally says the words of consecration in Latin.

FX said...

Last sunday in Versailles, France, St Jeanne d'Arc Parish, we sung all the gregorian proper of the IVth sunday of Lent (Laetare, Ierusalem).
The priest also chanted the "Per ipsum", the "praeceptis salutaribus moniti" and the Pater.
This is a novus ordo Mass. We will chant also almost eveything for holy Friday. We also chanted all the office of Vespers (with no vernacular except for the lectio brevis) for the feast of the diocese (St Louis), with our bishop.

Anonymous said...

St. Sebastian in Santa Paula uses some Latin in their early Mass on Sunday (such as the gloria, and even the Creed). And of course Thomas Aquinas College (not really a parish) in Santa Paula also does all of its Masses with the ordinary in Latin, and Chant at one Sunday Mass (with polyphony in another) [On occassion a whole Mass in Latin is celebrated too]

Paul said...

My home parish includes a smidge of Latin at Easter, but the parish where I attend weekday Mass (St. Peter Chanel in Los Angeles)does have Latin intermittently throughout the year (Agnus Dei, Sanctus, Gloria and more) plus the Kyrie.

Ss. Peter & Paul in Wilmington (near Long Beach in LA) has a Sunday Latin Novus Ordo.

Anonymous said...

I am the choir director for St. Michael Church in Memphis, TN. We are singing the Jubilate Deo ordinaries during the season of Lent and will sing the Missa de Angelis for the Easter Vigil and the Mass of the day. We are also including several Latin pieces during the Triduum.
We have not decided to sing Latin all of the time because it is very new to the congregation and we want to take things slowly.
We will be singing Latin again on the Solemnity of Corpus Christi for our Mass and procession.

Ephraem said...

At Campion College in Sydney we use the Missa Primitiva every day at Mass. On some occasions the canon is sung or recited in Latin. The Pater Noster is often in Latin and of course motets etc are often in Latin. On Saturdays and Sundays the priest faces ad orientem.

Lawrence King said...

St. Mary Magdalene in Berkeley, California uses Latin hymns, and even the Latin mysterium fidei in some its Masses.

Anonymous said...

Holy Rosary Parish in Cleveland, Ohio.

The Kyrie is in Greek during both Advent and Lent, and at other times as Father chooses (probably every other week or so). We have Latin chant for the ordinaries during Advent, Lent, Christmas and Epiphany. Additionally, the response to the general intercessions during Lent has been "Salvator Mundi, Salva Nos" (a Taize setting).

The choir routinely sings hymns in Latin or Italian. The choir director (who is rather fond of Latin and Italian) just acquired a copy of the 1941 St. Gregory Hymnal, and I have a feeling that more Latin hymns are forthcoming.

I wish we'd have the Latin chant during ordinary time.

John Miller said...

The Cathedral of Ss. Simon & Jude in the Diocese of Phoenix has Solemn Mass every Sunday @11am sung in Latin. The 9am TV Mass also has Latin Mass parts as well as the Communio chanted by the Men's Schola. Polyphonic pieces are sung. A small string ensemble (made up of members of the Phoenix Symphony) accompany some pieces and play during the Offertory in Ordinary time.

http://www.simonjude.org

Layla said...

My parish, St. Mary of the Seven Sorrows (Diocese of Nashville, TN), has the N.O. in Latin on the first and third Sundays of each month.

mgibson said...

Here in the Twin Cities, we do have St. Agnes (as mentioned above, though far too briefly!) which offers a full Latin (minus readings/homily/petitions) sung Novus Ordo "High Mass" at 10am on Sundays, complete with orchestral accompaniment, chorale, and all the traditional trimmings (altar rails, ad orientum, old Roman vestments, 15+ altar boys in cassock/surplice, etc). St. Agnes also offers this "High" Mass on solemnities at 10am, if you can get there. On the first Saturday of the month, at the 5:15 pm Mass, the Mass is in chanted Latin with a schola. Every Saturday morning, the 8:00am daily Mass is also in Latin.

Other parishes that use Latin (that I know of) -

St. Anthony of Padua in NE Minneapolis offers a Marian Latin NO Mass on Saturday mornings too at 8:30 am, with Holy Hour preceding it at 7:30 am.

The Cathedral of St. Paul has a wonderful choir that does the Propers at the 10am Mass on Sundays, once in awhile the schola will sing them instead. I do not know for sure if there has been any Latin used in the Ordinary, as I am not usually able to go to the 10am Mass anymore.

I know you said no Tridentine Masses, but I can't help it :) - St. Augustine's in South St. Paul offers the Tridentine indult every Sunday at 11:30am, and on the eve of Holy Days and on First Fridays at 7pm.

Ray from MN said...

Novus Ordo Latin Masses
#
Saturday - Gregorian Chant Responses by the Congregation

# St Agnes, St Paul: 8:00 a.m.

# St Anthony, Mpls: 7:30 a.m. Holy Hour 8:30 a.m. Mass


# St Agnes, St Paul: 5:15 p.m., Solemn High Mass every First Saturday; a capella Chamber Choir sings polyphonic (Renaissance) Masses

#
Sunday

# St Agnes, St Paul: 10:00 a.m., Symphonic with Chorus or Schola alone; see schedule

Tridentine Latin Masses
# Sts Peter and Paul, Mankato, MN: 8:45 a.m. Mass every First Saturday; Confession before Mass

# St Augustine, S St Paul: 11:30 a.m. Sundays; also 7:30 p.m. on First Fridays and Holy Days of Obligation

# Sacred Heart, Flensburg, MN: 9:00 a.m. Sundays

# St John's, Rochester, MN, 1st Sunday only: 4:00 p.m.

# St Francis Xavier, Dyersville, IA: 12:00 Sundays

# Epiphany, Sioux City, IA: 7:30 a.m. Sundays

# Immaculate Conception, Rapid City, SD: 8:00 a.m. weekdays; 10:00 a.m. Sunday

Julia said...

St Teresa, Belleville, Illinois

We are singing the Kyrie as the Penetential Rite, the Sanctus from the Deutsche Mass by Schubert and an Agnus Dei from the LA diocese written for a visit from JP II.

Anonymous said...

St. Matthew's Cathedral, South Bend, and the Cathedral at the University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana. Latin mass parts for both.

Lee Gilbert said...

At St. Vianney in Northlake, IL we have the Kyrie, the Sanctus, the Agnus Dei. Frequently the organist or choir will sing Latin hymns.

Anonymous said...

Our Lady of Lourdes, Philadelphia, Latin Novus Ordo every week.

Fr. Stephen Naas said...

Here at St. Mary Parish, Marshall, Michigan (Diocese of Kalamazoo) we chant the Kyrie, Sanctus,and Agnus Dei at various times throughout the whole litugical year. No complaints, but sometimes there are questions about what we are singing. "What (or who) is this Agnes Dee Eye?". We are working on pronunciation. Choir has done Panis Angelicus, Adoramus Te, Christe, Pange Lingua - more pieces in Latin are in the works. The children's choir is working on some Latin things and they love it.

Karie said...

St. Peter Church in Volo, IL has a "Novus Ordo" mass with parts of it sung/chanted in Latin. But they also have a beautiful noon service in the Tridentine tradition. We're thinking of transferring over to that church.

Anonymous said...

At Naomh Colmcille, Oilean Thoraigh, Ireland, we have Mass in Latin at the 11am Mass of Our Lady on Saturdays.

Fr J Boyce

Ferde Rombola said...

At St. Mary Star of the Sea in Beverly, MA we sing the Kyrie in Greek and the Angus Dei in Latin at the 9AM Mass on Sunday all year. One Sunday a month there is a Gregorian Chant Mass at 5PM. One evening, following Adoration and Benediction, our pastor announced he would be celebrating Mass in a few minutes. About half a dozen of us stuck around. He spoke the entire Liturgy in latin. What a treat!!

Anonymous said...

Our Lady of Czestechowa Parish, Turners Falls, Ma in the Springfield Diocese has chanted Sanctus and Agnus Dei at all Masses (Daily and Sunday). For me it's truly a blessing to be able to stop by such a vibrant parish with daily confessions every couple weeks or so.

Anonymous said...

The Pittsburgh Oratory / University of Pittsburgh Newman Center, during the time I attended there 2 to 3 years ago, did all the propers in Gregorian chant. Every single Sunday.

It was lovely.

Roxanne McNally said...

My parish is St. Francis of Assisi in Neligh, Nebr. This is our fourth year singing the Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Lent. Our neighboring parish, St. Boniface in Elgin, used the Agnus Dei for the first time last year in Lent and added the Sanctus this year. I play for the K-6 school Masses there.

Anonymous said...

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Portland, Maine. The Agnus Dei is sung by the congregation in Latin at nearly every weekend Mass. That's the only prayer we sing in Latin, but our choir and Schola does sing Latin hymns and chants at several Masses.

Anonymous said...

Hey good folks! In Vancouver, British Columbia, the choir at my parish, St. Anthony of Padua, chants parts of the Mass Ordinary in Latin every Sunday at 10am: Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei, with organ accompaniments outside of Advent and Lent. They sing Masses VIII, XI, and XVII, according to the season, and the congregation sings along with them. They also do the occasional Gregorian chant (Ave Maria, Adoro te, Pange lingua, and seasonal stuff like Veni, Emmanuel) and a solo chanter sings the Communion Antiphon from the Graduale with psalm verses, as well as the occasional prose, hymn, or respond from the Cantus Selecti.

Anonymous said...

Queen of Angels Parish, Chicago, IL. Kyrie in Greek and Sanctus & Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent this year. Latin used sporatically for hymns. Our Choristers (ages 9-14) have prepared a number of pieces in Latin and they love it.

Maureen said...

My parish, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, Carmel, Indiana sings the Kyrie in Greek and the Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent. We also have some hymns that have some verses in Latin that we sing.

Allison said...

The Cathedral of Saint Paul in Saint Paul, MN sings the Latin Sanctus and Agnus Dei during Lent. That is, we sing it. I do not know if we do chant (I wouldn't know enough to recognize it, I suspect.) The choir sings some pieces in Latin as well. I think it's possible they even sing in chant some modern works.

We have some beautiful Kyries in Greek, during Advent and Lent; we also have had the choir sing some, including the Palestrina's Kyrie.

Our music directors are brilliant and accomplished. Their modern works are beautiful as well.

Lenor said...

Immaculate Heart in Portland OR, 5:30 pm Saturdays. Not just Latin, full choir.

St. Joseph's in Vancouver WA, does a little bit of Latin in Lent.

Kathryn said...

Hi! My parish, Good Shepherd in Orlando, FL, began offering the Agnus during Lent about two years ago. I'm trying to nudge some more Latin out of the Music Minister slowly, but surely. maybe I'll ask my pastor about the Ite for Easter in Latin. ;D Pax et Bonum! Kathryn.

Anonymous said...

For many years, at Sacred Heart in downtown Atlanta, GA, the 10:00am Mass on the first Sunday of the month is a Latin Mass, with the ordinary chanted in Latin.

Kelly said...

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Boston:

Kyrie, Sanctus, Agnus Dei, always during Advent and Lent, often in Ordinary Times.

Saint Francis Chapel, Boston:

Sanctus, Agnus Dei, since the Pope's recent encyclical.

Bob said...

My parish, St. Jerome's in Hyattsville, MD, has regularly sung the Kyrie in Greek and the Agnus Dei in Latin, especially during Lent. We have also chanted the "De Angelis" Gloria in Latin and in English, and the Pater Noster (Latin and English chant). We occasionally do a Taize Sanctus in Latin, and Pietro Yon's Mass of the Shepherds at Christmas Midnight Mass. On Good Friday we do Vittoria's setting of the Reproaches, in English. We also do a bit of Anglican chant (Gospel verses mostly)during Lent and Advent.

Anonymous said...

St. Martin of Tours, Louisville KY uses latin for much of the "peoples ordinary"--Gloria, sanctus, agnus dei etc. also greek for the kyrie.

this is standard for the 11:00 mass on sundays, and is used during lent/advent at the 9:30.

Church is full.

Mitch S.

fxr2 said...

Father Fox,
I'm sorry there were too many coments for me to be certain that my parish was not already mentioned. St. Peter's Parish in Merchantville, NJ has begun using greek for the kyrie and latin for the Confiteor, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei in many of their masses. There is also a fair amount of Latin Hymns

Timothy said...

The Cathedral of Saint Andrew on the Diocese of Little Rock uses Latin. The Sanctus has been subng in Latin on at least two visits this year.

St Edwards Church, also in Little Rock, AR, has both the Sanctus and Agnus dei in Latin.

St Patrick Church in North Little Rock, AR hosts a Tridentine mass each Sunday morning. Latin all the way, except when Greek is called for.

The Mount Saint Mary Academy (Little Rock) Women's Chorus regularly sings the Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin at school. My daughter regularly sings the both around the house in Latin. I had to correct her misbelief that the Kyrie was in Latin. She was astonished to discover she had been singing in Greek. (She was born on Crete.)

Latin and Greek are much more common than most folks realize. Millions of Americans regularly sing and pray in Latin. That number is only increasing.

Anonymous said...

Not sure if somebody from my parish has already told you...St. Mary's (Dominicans), New Haven, CT. The noon Mass is in Latin and it's fabulous! Sadly, the credo is in Latin and so people don't seem to say it!! Please, if you do the creed in Latin, print it out so people can join in!
Good luck, father!

Joe S. said...

In Boston area that haven't been already mentioned (these use Latin/chant variously throughout the year)

St. Paul's in Cambridge, home of the Boston Boy Choir http://www.stpaulparish.org/

St. Cecilia's (but of course!)http://www.stceciliaboston.org/

I'm not 100% positive, but I would imagine Our Lady of Lourdes does,

www.themissionchurch.com/

Although controversial, I've heard the Paulist Center does use Latin and chant from time to time

At my home parish (St. Francis Xavier) we occasionally do an anthem/motet in Latin as well as the Pange Lingua on Holy Thurseday.

When I did my undergrad at Holy Cross in Worcester, I sang in a schola, we chanted the Agnus Dei (Mass XVIII) as well as the Sanctus and Kyrie in Lent, as well many anthems/motets in Latin and English chant.

Of course, let us not forget the Cathedral of the Madeline in Salt Lake, home of the Madeline Choir School.

Esther said...

This past Sunday our associate pastor chanted during the Consecration in English. He did tell us to read the new encyclical and that Latin has a place in our Masses. This was in Sacred Heart Parish, Honolulu.

Anonymous said...

Annunciation Parish in Saint Louis, MO sings the Kyrie in Greek, and the Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin during Lent. Pange Lingua has been a staple during the Triduum for years.

RP Burke said...

In Lent, St. Joseph Cathedral in Columbus, Ohio, uses Latin chant for the Sanctus and Agnus Dei of Sunday Mass.

I'm also pretty confident that my old parish, St. Paul Church outside Harvard Square in Cambridge, Mass., frequently uses Latin settings of the Mass -- both chant and modern settings like Langlais's Solemn Mass -- throughout the year.

Anonymous said...

Fr. Steven Lange at St. Peter's Catholic Church in Spirng Grove Illinois in the Rockrod Diocese is using Latin chant, Latin ordinaries, and the Pater Noster during Lent. Also, can count upwards of 20 young men discerning a Vocation to the Priesthood or Religious life and several young ladies discerning Religious life.
The children and young people love the chant and he supplies worship aides for those who need a little reminding of how it goes.

John C. Hathaway said...

Well, for parishes I’m familiar with:

1. St. Joseph’s in Columbia, SC, uses several parts of Latin chant (we went there last Sunday, for evening mass, no less, and it was a *very* well done liturgy).

2. There’s (or was) a complete Novus Ordo Mass once a month at St. patrick’s in Spotsylvania, VA. Fr. Paul Scalia used to say it. I’m not 100% certain they still have it. But they don’t just do chant, they do polyphony, and much of the polyphony they do is original, written by a local composer.

3. There’s a priest here in Sumter, SC, whose pastor will not allow Latin, but he will say the “controversial” parts of the English liturgy (e.g., “for you and for many") in Spanish or Latin “under his breath”.

4. A really good source is my father, who is the music director at St. Vincent De Paul in Wildwood, FL (coincidentally Sumter County, FL). Here’s their website: http://www.sumtercatholic.org. They have pics of my dad and everything. He does a mix of “contemporary,” Spanish music, 60s stuff, traditional “hymns” (both Catholic and Protestant), Gregorian Chant and even the occasional polyphony, and he usually does at least the Agnus Dei in Latin. His love for Tantum Ergo has incurred the wrath of pastors at previous parishes he’s played for.

Anonymous said...

St. Dominic's Church, Bush and Steiner Streets in San Francisco, Archdiocese of San Francisco. Dominicans. 11 AM Solemn Novus Ordo Mass every Sunday sung by the wonderful choir with chant, polyphony (Vittoria and Palestrina--they have cut a CD), etc.

At daily Masses and other Sunday Masses the congregation often sings the Sanctus and Agnus (Mass XVIII) from memory--all the priest has to do is start it. Friars and novices often sing other chants--e.g. the Dominican Salve at the Divine Office. (Although not in point, I will mention that they have been known to have Dominic Rite High Mass on occasion.)

Brian Michael Page said...

Wow - busy thread here! :)

Holy Ghost Church in Tiverton, RI, where I am music director:
Entire season of Lent: Sanctus, Memorial, Agnus in Latin (Jubilate Deo).
This year we taught Gloria VIII. We're using that year round when liturgically fit (outside of Advent/Lent, that is).
Entire season of Advent: Sanctus and Agnus in Latin (we do a memorial that I adapted from "Conditor Alme Siderum").
Remainder of year: Latin Mass chants at all Masses on the last Sunday of each month.
BMP

Brian Michael Page said...

(forgot to mention...)
Easter and Pentecost sequence, and the Palm Sunday "Hosanna filio David" in Latin at choir Mass (English at non-choir Masses).
BMP

Ellen said...

St. Joseph's Bowling Green Kentucky. We chant the Kyrie, Sanctus and Agnus Dei during Lent.

We also use some of the Latin hymns, such as Adoramus Te Christe during Lent. (Now if only they would sing Parce Domini, I would be in Heaven).

John L. Wright said...

My brother who lives in Urbana tells me that they at St. Mary's use more Latin than we do at either parish in Piqua. I know that Sacred Heart in St. Paris (about 75 families strong) use Latin ordinaries from time to time.

Jason Pennington said...

I'm happy to see that someone else mentioned my parish before I did. Thanks! As you can imagine, we've been extremely busy at Our Lady of Fatima in Lafayette, our pastor having been made Bishop of Lake Charles.

At any rate, at Our Lady of Fatima, we have a Latin Mass ordinary at every Sunday solemn Mass (9am). In addition, our Schola Gregoriana sings the proper introit, Alleluia and often also the communion. The choir offers an anthem or motet(s) at the offertory or communion (or both) in either Latin or English. The tracts of Holy Week will be in Latin, as will be the Mandatum chants and the Reproaches of Good Friday. We usually sing Missa VIII with Credo III through the year and at Paschaltide, and Missa XVII with Credo III during Advent and Lent. During Advent and Lent, the Saturday vigil and the 11am Sunday Mass use the chants from Iubilate Deo.
At the monthly French Mass, a few voices of the schola sing the introit of the week and the communion. At Benediction on the Eve of First Friday, we often sing Latin hymns along with the compulsory O Salutaris and the Tantum Ergo.

Jason Pennington, Orgnist-Director of Music, Fatima Church, Lafayette, Louisiana

john knoll said...

Holy Family Parish in Parma, OH (suburb of Cleveland)regularly chants the Agnus Dei in Latin and occasionaly the Kyrie in Greek.

Kasia said...

St. Anastasia, Troy, Mich. - Greek Kyrie during Lent and occasional Latin. Particularly, our senior pastor encourages the priests to do the words of consecration in Latin, which they sometimes do.

Also, think someone mentioned it, but a friend of mine attends SS. Cyril & Methodius in Sterling Heights, Mich. They use a fair bit of Latin, and I believe they have started using Gregorian chant.

I would be very surprised if Assumption Grotto in Detroit didn't use some Latin as well (excluding their Latin Novus Ordo Mass, which is celebrated weekly in addition to English Novus Ordo).

Anonymous said...

My home parish in Peoria, IL, often uses the Latin Mass parts, especially during Lent. Also, the Cathedral in Peoria offers the Novus Ordo Mass in Latin every Saturday for the SUnday vigil.

T.O. said...

The Latin Mass parts are used in Lent and Advent at St. Basil's Parish in Toronto.

Anonymous said...

St. Mary of Perpetual Help Church in Chicago chants the English Propers for the Offertory and Communion each week, prior to singing any hymns or any choral works. The ordinary of the Mass for the season of Lent is the Missa de Angelis and for the warmer summer months, they sing the chanted Corpus Christi Mass by Proulx.

David L Alexander said...

In the Diocese of Arlington (Virginia), several parishes have at least one Latin Mass (Missal of Paul VI) every Sunday, including St John's in McLean and St Andrew's in Clifton. Both (or at least St John's) celebrates this Mass "facing East." Many of the parishes have started using the Kyrie, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei from the Jubilate Deo setting during Lent, including my own parish, the Cathedral of St Thomas More.

Two parishes in our diocese have a "Tridentine" Latin Mass every Sunday, under the terms of the Indult. Several more would do so as well, provided... well, you know.

Frank Byrne said...

Kyrie, Agnus Dei and Sanctus are sung or chanted regularly at our parish-St Basil The Great-Dushore PA-Scranton diocese. Our pastor-Fr. Kozak- also chants the preface.

Nick Bonadies said...

Our Lady of Mt Carmel parish in Youngstown Ohio uses the Sanctus and Angus Dei during Advent and Lent. It would be good if it would be used all year.

Robert Carter said...

Two places come to mind:

St. John Cantius in Chicago does beautiful Latin Masses in Tridentine and Novus Ordo
http://www.cantius.org/

St. Scholastica's Priory in Petersham, MA does Latin (esp. Gregorian Chant) Novus Ordo Masses.
http://www.petershampriory.org/

Fr. John Pecoraro said...

St. Mary's Catholic Church and Holy Family Mission in Camden TN/ Huntingdon TN uses the Kyrie, Sanctus, and Agnus all year round, sometimes interchanging with english every other week. More from Paul VI's Jublate Deo is going to be taught and used in the future.

Anonymous said...

At St. Ann Church, Hampton, NJ, we have had Latin ordinary every other Sunday at Noon Mass, for 10+ years (except Credo-priests balk at this!) and have always included Latin hymns, as appropriate. In the past year, at 2 other Masses, Latin propers have been intoduced. Hopefully, we will be able to move to having the entire Mass sung, in Latin, at least every other week.

Bob

Tony said...

My Parish, for the first time this year, is planning an entire chant setting for Holy Thursday (except for a couple of songs (even Mandatum Novum for the foot washing, and Pange Lingua for the Eucharistic procession.

I may even get it recorded and post the MP3 (maybe with the copyrighted songs, if any, beeped out :))

David Stein said...

St. Gertrude Church
Madeira, Ohio
www.stgertrude.org

sanctus and agnus dei in latin at least once a month or so

Pespodatus said...

For those keeping track, every state in the USA is represented here except the following:

alaska
idaho
iowa
mississippi
montana
nevada
new hampshire
new mexico
north dakota
oklahoma
vermont
west virginia
wyoming

Tom Weber said...

A couple more to add to the list:
Mt. Angel Abbey in Mt. Angel, OR;
Our Lady of Consolation Briggitine Monastery in Amity, OR.

Anonymous said...

My parish used Latin on a regular basis at most of the Sunday Masses. During Lent we sing plain chant for all Mass parts. We also sing some standard hymns in Latin year round. Holy Family Catholic Church, Dale City, VA.

Fr. Thomas Kocik said...

At the chapel of Charlton Hospital in Fall River, Mass., where I serve as chaplain, we chant the Latin Sanctus and Agnus Dei and Greek Kyrie every Sunday; occasionally I will pray the Canon in Latin as well.

At the various local parishes where I assist, I always make it a point to use some Latin at every Mass, at least the Agnus Dei and occasionally the Doxology. On Sundays and solemnities, I always chant the orations and the Preface. And if I happen to be at a parish where the bells have been hidden away, I'll highlight the consecration by chanting it.

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